Puppy Pads: Are They a Long-Term Solution?

If there’s one thing many dog owners hate doing, it’s dealing with their dog’s toilet problems. After all, no one wants to clean up messes and accidents, especially when it gets smelly! Fortunately, there are solutions such as puppy pads or dog pee pads, which make it easier to clean up after your pets.

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However, are pee pads the optimum solution to your dog’s housetraining issues? And if they are, what kind of puppy pads should you invest in? I researched all about these potty pads and will answer all your questions on it, so read on!

Puppy Pads: Frequently Asked Questions

puppy pads

They won’t pee or poo directly on the floor, making it a great choice, right? Or wrong?

Pee pads, as the name suggests, are small pads you lay on floors for your dog to do their business on. They won’t pee or poo directly on the floor, making it a great choice, right? Or wrong?

Based on my experience and research on puppy pads, these are the most asked queries which can make or break your decision to use such products:

1. What Do Puppy Pads Teach Dogs?

Puppy pads teach, in fact, encourage, them to pee and poo in the house and solely on the pad.

Puppy pads offer great benefits in terms of lesser hassles in cleaning accidents, however, it comes with disadvantages.

When using a puppy pad and introducing it to your dog, it gets him used to doing his business on the pad and inside the house. Puppy pads teach, in fact, encourage, them to pee and poo in the house and solely on the pad.

If you do use a pee pad often, then it will take time to change until your dog associates the outside as his bathroom, not on a pee pad in the living area.

That’s why you probably noticed why your dog doesn’t want to do is business when you take them out, only to do it in the house. With that said, I highly discourage you to use a pee pad and go with regular training. If you do use a pee pad often, then it will take time to change until your dog associates the outside as his bathroom, not on a pee pad in the living area.

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2. What Makes the Rug and Puppy Pad Different? 

Because of this, he’ll grow accustomed to doing his business on cotton surfaces rather than on grass outdoors.

We know the main difference between the pee pad and rug, but the dog doesn’t. He just thinks both are the same since they have a similar texture and feel. Because of this, he’ll grow accustomed to doing his business on cotton surfaces rather than on grass outdoors.

What does this mean for you? It means your rugs, bathmat, carpet, and anything soft in the house may fall victim to your dog’s bathroom accidents! And no, they won’t know that they have to pee on a pee pad and not the rug. To a dog, especially a puppy still learning, they’re all just the same.

3. Why Does My Dog Pee Next to the Pad?  

if they stop doing their business on one particular pad, they tend to move next to it or another cotton-like surface.

A lot of people come to me saying, “my dog won’t pee on the pad anymore!” 

Well, that’s most likely because they’re now used to peeing anywhere indoors as long as it has a similar texture to their cotton pads. And if they stop doing their business on one particular pad, they tend to move next to it or another cotton-like surface. 

That’s why you’ll need to use more than one pee pad, which is a tedious and expensive chore. Plus, no one likes looking at a room full of pee pads!

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Better Alternatives to Puppy Pads 

dog pee pads

You can try to use fake grass, encouraging them to use it over pee pads. It’s best to use this as a way to transition it to the outdoors.

As you can see, puppy pads, or pee pads, aren’t the best long-term solution, nor is it a way to housetrain them. Because of this, it’s best to housetrain them and teach your dog how to do his business outside.

For dogs used to pee pads already, it’s best to use alternatives while training them to go outside. You can try to use fake grass, encouraging them to use it over pee pads. It’s best to use this as a way to transition it to the outdoors.

Continue taking him to potty breaks outdoors at a routine schedule as well, which allows him to get used to the routine of doing his business at set times.

It may be a bit tough making the transition, which is why you need to encourage him to do so. When he does do his business on the fake grass, reward him with a treat and praise. Afterward, slowly introduce him to doing his business outdoors, which he will then get used to after a few weeks.

Remember to clean it daily or the unclean grass will discourage him from using it. Continue taking him to potty breaks outdoors at a routine schedule as well, which allows him to get used to the routine of doing his business at set times.

When Do Puppy Pads Work? 

pee pads

So you’re housetraining your dogs using pee pads instead of the outdoors, which is also suitable for those who aren’t able to take them out for potty breaks.

While I’ve been discouraging you about pee pads, I also want to point out some good it offers. Pee pads are suitable for certain dog breeds, particularly smaller dogs under two pounds. 

So make sure you have the right attitude and take the time until your dog knows when and where to do his business.

Besides smaller dogs, it may also be suitable for homes without carpeted or cotton-like surfaces. That way, they know to only do their business on the pad and not on any of the harder surfaces. So you’re housetraining your dogs using pee pads instead of the outdoors, which is also suitable for those who aren’t able to take them out for potty breaks. 

However, it does take time and patience to fully housetrain them. So make sure you have the right attitude and take the time until your dog knows when and where to do his business.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vE63IUDDs_c

Wrapping It Up

While puppy pads are an enticing solution to your housetraining woes, they aren’t exactly the best long-term remedy. Once your puppy won’t poop on the pad, you’ll have trouble keeping them from making messes in other places in the house! That’s why it’s best to follow other alternatives to puppy pads for you and your dog’s sake.

I hope this article on puppy pads thoroughly explained what you need for your puppy and house training now. So don’t wait any longer and make the right investment for a well-behaved puppy.

Do you have any questions or want to share your experiences with puppy pads and housetraining? Then comment below, all your thoughts are much appreciated!

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